Copyright 2008 through 2016 by Stuart Schneider. Do not use any of these images without written permission and payment.

Books on Pens, etc

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Consultant

Ok. I've Seen Enough. Take me home!

Halloween Museum

Fluorescent minerals

Risque Cards, Rare pieces, and the Comet as Seen by the World

There were a group of slightly risque (for 1910) postcards produced with a comet theme. As expected they are a tough-to-find subcategory of Halley's Comet postcard collecting.

My favorite French set of 3 cards simply entitled "Before, During, & After"

A girl's school with girls in a state of undress
More girls in their undergarments

A page from the Nuremburg Chronicle, printed in 1493, and noting the appearance of a comet in 1457 that would later become known as Halley's Comet.
A closeup of the comet in the page

A small oil painting of the comet B. Brooks saw in October, 1882 from his room in Greenwich, Massachusetts.

 

Some of my favorite pieces are prints showing people watching the comet

1702 Copper engraving of the comet of 1680. From the book, Historisch Kroniek by Joh Lod Gottfriends. Text in French.

 

A 1690 Copper engraving of the Comet of 1680, Nuremburg, hand colored. Text in Latin and German. Christoph Weigel published under his latin name Christophoro Weigelio, his 'Ethica Naturalis, a so called "Emblem Book". Emblem books were a particular style of illustrated books developed in Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries. The 'Ethica Naturalis' contains 100 picture/text combinations, of which COMETA is number 92. It is a combination of an engraving and a short text.

Published in 1691 in Matheus Merian's Theatri Europaei, Zwölffter Theil. Of all the marvellous signs visible in the Heavens and on Earth none of the least is the dreadful comet which showed itself Thursday December 16, 1680,just after the fall of night. The star itself was as bright as the stars of the second of third brightness, but a very fiery tail, that when the star stood just about on the horizon would stretch from South-West to North-East and would cover most part of the sky. The tail was bright and clear, but transparent, so that the fixed stars underneath it were clearly visible and recognizable.

Satiricle print by Thomas Rowlandson, "Looking at the Comet till you get a Criek in the Neck", published by Thomas Tegg, and showing the comet of 1811 being viewed by an old man while his younger wife is being seduced by a visitor.

(Above) An 1820 print of the Comet of 1811 in England.

(Above) An incredibly rare French 1835 aquatint of Halley's Comet.

Watching the Comet of 1857
Paris, 1683. Copper engraving showing sword shapes of comets, 21 x 14 cms, French text on back, from Mallet’s "Description de l’Univers"

(Above) A print showing Parisians watching the 1857 Comet. (Interesting that the print above this is a modified portion of this print. In the print information, this was identified as the Comet of 1853)

A print showing Donati's comet of 1858

One of my favorite postcards - The comet over Russia.

There is a popular subgroup of postcards showing the comet over different cities.

The comet as it appeared over Marseilles France

The Comet over Gary, Indiana

The comet in Germany

A real photo card

The comet over Lookout Mountain
A great amusement park real photo

A Roman Punch

More comet pieces - Page One

More comet pieces - Page Two

More comet pieces - Page Three

More comet pieces - Page Four

More comet pieces - Page Five A

Rare Comet pieces For Sale - Page Six

Rare Comet pieces For Sale - Page Seven

 
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Copyright 2008 through 2017 by Stuart Schneider. You may not use any parts of these pages without written permission.