>

Books on Pens, etc

Books on Lincoln, etc

Books on Flashlights, etc

Find Out More About Me

Consultant

Ok. I've Seen Enough. Take me home!

Halloween Museum

email me at stuarts1031at erols.com

Page Three

The Museum of Abraham Lincoln Photographs, Miniature Paintings, and More

A ribbon and an albumen photograph pin for the 1864 political campaign

When Lincoln ran for President in 1864, he ran against former military commander George McClellan. Lincoln was worried that the military vote would go to McClellan since when he was the commander, the soldiers loved him.

Turns out he should not have worried so much since the soldiers regarded Lincoln as a father figure. They felt that he would not be waging a war with the South if it was not important to the future of the country. The soldiers were among Lincon's greatest supporters.

Comets were seen as a harbinger of change.
In 1861 a comet appeared and the soldiers considered it a sign that the war would change everything

A rare CDV taken by Brady's studio in 1862
Another CDV taken by Brady's studio in 1862

A CDV taken by Thomas LeMere at Brady's studio on April 17, 1863 A CDV taken by Brady's studio on January 8, 1864

A framed group with a short autographed note from Lincoln and two rare CDVs. The CDV on the left was probably taken by Wendroth & Taylor in 1864. The CDV on the right was taken by Brady's studio in 1862.

Stereoview of Lincoln by Brady's studio taken in late 1861

A CDV of Lincoln taken by Brady's studio on January 8, 1864 and sold through Brady's New York Gallery The same CDV taken by Brady's studio on January 8, 1864 and sold through his Washington DC Gallery

A CDV taken by Brady's studio on January 8, 1864
A CDV taken by Brady's studio on January 8, 1864

A rare and different "Crewcut" stereoview of Abraham Lincoln by Brady's studio taken in late 1864

An Alexander Gardner photo of Lincoln taken on February 5, 1865. He has aged quite a bit. A CDV of Lincoln taken on the balcony of the White House by Henry Warren on March 6, 1865

The Grand National Banner of the Radical Democracy for 1864 showing Fremont and Cochrane, lesser known candidates

One of the last photographs of Lincoln was taken on the balcony of the White House on March 6, 1865. The photographer, Henry F. Warren, could not gain entrance to the President’s home to photograph Lincoln. He went outside and photographed Tad Lincoln riding his favorite pony. Returning the next day, he showed the finished photos to Mrs. Lincoln and gave them to her as a gift. She asked what she could do in return and Warren asked her to arrange for him to photograph the President. You can see that Lincoln is not pleased with the imposition. Warren took photos and published them for sale the next day. When Lincoln died in April, Warren continued to sell the photos but changed the caption from “The Latest Photograph of President Lincoln” to “The Last Photograph of President Lincoln”. The photos are found in sizes from a CDV to an 11” x 14” photo. The two photos below are 6” x 8” on a mount of 10 x 13.5 inches.

Taken on March 6th and printed while Lincoln was alive. Taken on March 6th and printed after Lincoln's death.

 

Lincoln Museum - Page One

Lincoln Museum - Page Two

Lincoln Museum - Page Four

Lincoln Museum - Page Five

Home | Lawyer| Halloween Museum| Books #1 on Fountain Pens & Ballpoint pens| Ghostwriter| Fluorescent Minerals
Books #2 on Lincoln, Halloween & Cigarette Lighters| Flashlight Museum| Photography
| Comets | Space Memorabilia
Books #3 on Flashlights, Picture Frames & Halley's Comet | Ghosts In The Cemetery| Waffle Recipies| Links
Copyright 2008 - 2017 by Stuart Schneider. Do not use any parts of these pages without written permission.